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7/ 



COLLEGE 



7N EW5 



Vol. 4. No. 19. 



WELLESLEY. MASS., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 1905. 



Price, 5 Cents 



THE GLEE AND MANDOLIN 
CLUB CONCERT. 

Wellesley's gala night, February 22, 
was celebrated by the usual Glee and Man- 
dolin Club concert, given in College Hall 
Chapel. This year's performance proved 
to be an excellent one, and both clubs 
were received with much enthusiasm by 
the appreciative college audience. The 
Glee Club has added several new voices to 
its number, and the quality of tone is 
refreshingly good. The Mandolin Club, 
which maintains a high standard of ex- 
cellence, has also been fortunate in its 
additions. 

Of Part I, the Mandolin Club's first 
number, and first encore, "In Nature's 
Garden," deserve especial mention. ' 'What 
the Chimney Sang," was a unique and 
pleasing number, and the "Midnight Sere- 
nade," which was notable for its alto solo 
part, was rendered by the two clubs with 
good effect. Gottschalk's exquisite "Idle- 
wilde" was given a sympathetic interpre- 
tation. Great interest was shown in the 
Wellesley "Problems," so entertainingly 
sung by Miss Daniels, and when two rows 
of blue-books suddenly appeared to make 
vivid the difficulties set forth, the faces of 
the major part of the audience wore ex- 
pressions of fellow feeling. In the Welles- 
ley Step Song, Miss Npvin, who composed 
both words and music, seems to have 
struck a true Wellesley note, and the song 
will probably be a favorite at Wellesley. 
As an encore to this number Miss Nevin 
sang her "Sign of the Four," which first 
appeared in 1903, and so delighted the 
Glee Club audience of that year. 

The "Woodland" airs, in Part III, met 
with a cordial reception, as did also the 
"Pow-wow" arranged by Mr. Lansing for 
the Mandolin Club. Miss Pinkham's con- 
tralto solo, and the "Tale of Wynken, 
Blynken and Nod," by Miss Nevin, and the 
Glee Club, were among the best numbers. 
"Alma Mater" ended the program, and 
not without a touch of sadness for those 
who realize that for them the Glee Club 
concerts are numbered. Following is the 
program in full : 



PART I. 

a. '"Neath the Oaks" 
Arr. by Edith Sawyer 

b. "Snowflakes" F. H. Cowen 

GLEE CLUB. 

''The Masterstroke" J. B. Lampe 

MANDOLIN CLUB. 

''What the Chimney Sang. " 

Gertrude Griswold 

GLEE CLUB. 

•'Mondaine Waltz," 

Arr. by G. L. Lansing 

MANDOLIN CLUB. 

"A Midnight Serenade". . Cissie Loftus 

GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUBS. 

PART II. 
Minuet Patty Stair 

GLEE CLUB. 

"Idlewilde," L. F. Gottschalk 

MANDOLIN CLUB. 

" Problems." 
Music from "Babes in Toyland ; words by 
R W. P., O. A. N. and A. L. G., Jr. 

MISS DANIELS AND GLEE CLUB. 

"Beauty's Dream" . . . Lester W. Keith 

MANDOLIN CLUB. 

"Wellesley Step Song," 

Words and music by O. A. N- 

GLEE CLUB. 

PART III. 
"Woodland". .Arr. by T. P. Trinkaus 

MANDOLIN CLUB. 

Selected. 

MISS PINKHAM. 

•'Pow-wow". .Arr. by G. L. Lansing 

MANDOLIN CLUB. 

"Wynken, Blynken and Nod," 

E. Nevin 

MISS NEVIN AND GLEE CLUB. 

a. "The Woodpecker" E. Nevin 

b. "Alma Mater" Flora S. Ward 

GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUBS. 

O. G. 1906. 



The Recent Exhibit of Water Colors 

by F. Hopkinson Smith at the 

Gallery of Doll & Richards, 

Boston 

The name of F. Hopkinson Smith, civil 
engineer, writer and painter, is the modern 



synonym for versatility. Wellesley girls 
will remember that we heard Mr. Hopkin- 
son Smith read selections from his own 
stories here last winter. Many of us, for 
that reason, have been interested to see 
forty of his water-colors on exhibition in 
Boston. This collection was perhaps typ- 
ical of the artist's work, intelligent, direct, 
effective, and pleasing, yet uneven in 
quality, and often too thin in tone. This 
irregularity is illustrated by a comparison 
of the suggestiveness and beauty of treat- 
ment, the depth of tone, in "The Highway 
of the Doges," and in "Where the Women 
Walk," with the chromo effect, like scenery 
painting, of some of his forest scenes. 

Most of us think of Mr. Hopkinson 
S.nith as a painter of Venetian scenes, of 
lagoons and proud, Byzantine palaces. 
As a matter of fact, it is in the treatment 
of such subjects that he is most successful. 
We are thinking especially of a picture al- 
ready mentioned, "The Highway of the 
Doges," a long vista of sapphire lagcon 
between diverging lines of white palace. 
The artist's knowledge of architecture, as 
a civil engineer, is always apparent in his 
intelligent, faultless drawing of buildings 
such as the ornately carved, arcaded 
"Corner of the Palazzo," and "The Glory 
of Venice." On the other hand, his ten- 
dency to thinness of tone is illustrated in 
the seven or eight landscapes of forest and 
meadow, strikingly the artist's least in- 
dividual and most superficial work. 

The painter has been adversely criti- 
cised often by the more conservative 
critics and artists for his independent and 
inartistic method of gaining effects. It 
is true that he paints on tinted paper, 
uses pencil marks for gray tone, and lays 
on his water-color paint as thickly as oil, 
when he chooses, but no one can deny 
that he obtains subtle and convincing 
effects of atmosphere-mistiness, wetness 
or clear grayness, and. without bordering 
on impressionism, of subdued sunlight. 
One of his most remarkable paintings for 
its cleverness in effects is "The Wet Cross- 
ing." Here the sunlight of late afternoon 
is literally dissolving a storm. The fog 
is rising from the gray, wet pavement 
and from the surrounding buildings, but 
about the square, hazy sunlight is touch- 
ing the gilded domes of St. Mark's with a 
glow and is penetrating downward through 
the mist to the thoroughfare below. What 
ever people may say in disparagement of 
Mr. Hopkinson Smith's paintings, almost 
everybody finds in them something to 
enjoy, as those who have had the pleasure 
of seeing this recent exhibition will agree. 

A. C, '07. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Coll ege IFl ews. 

Pant or N. A. Linoscy A. Co., Boston. 



Published weekly. Subscription price, 75 cents a 
year to resident subscribers ; $1.00 per year to non- 
resident subscribers. 

All advertising communications should be sent to 
Miss C. W. Rogers, Wellesley Inn, Wellesley. 

All business correspondence should be addressed to 
HELEN R. NORTON, Business Manager College 
News. 

All subscriptions should be sent to Elizabeth 
Camp. 



Editor-in-Chief, Mary Jessie Gidley, 1906 

Associate Editor, Sadie M. Samuel, 1906 

Literart Editors, 

Winifred Hawkridge, 1906 Mary Lee Cadwell, 1906 

Marie Warren. 1907 

Ai.omn.k Editor, Roxana H. Vivian, 1894 

Managing Editors, 

Helen R. Norton, 1905 Elizabeth Camp. 1905 

J. Gertrude Francis. 1906 



"Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1903, at the post office at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 



With the opening of the new semester, 
come all sorts of fresh incentives to work — 
in the form of good resolutions, 
.made in the wee. sma' hours some night 
during mid-years, "not to let things go," 
but more in the form of renewed interest, 
gathered during the rest season spent 
perhaps in the bracing salt air at the shore; 
perhaps just being lazy here at college, 
reading and drinking afternoon tea with 
one's friends, or perhaps — if one were 
very lucky — at home. But there is not 
one of us who has not the wish, deep down 
inside, that however worth while last 
semester proved, this semester is to be 
better still. 

But here, let 's stop and glance over our 
plans, just to see if they are not a bit .self- 
centered; for is not that the thing which 
we have most to fear in our college rela- 
tions? It is almost impossible not to have 
our own classes, our own friends, our own 
special hobbies pretty constantly in mind, 
and our extreme interest — the very in- 
terest which is going to do such wonders 
for our work — is going, if we don't watch 
it, to keep us from many other things that, 
if we stopped to remember them, we 
should be sorry to miss. 



It's a F QW N ES' 

That's all you 
need to know about 
a glove 



NEW SPRING NOVELTIES 
IN JEWELRY. 

Belt Buckles, 

Hat Pins, 

LUaist Sets- 

Let us show you our New Hat Pin Holder 

for the dressing table. 

41 Summer St. 

Next Door Hovey's 

BOSTON. 




Wholesale and Retail 



First of all there is our ideal of service 
to be lived up to. The countless everyday 
things that in our hurry we overlook — 
the smiling bow even when we are hurry- 
ing class-wards, the note of commendation 
of work well done which we surely meant 
to write, the brief call on a homesick or 
worried friend — all these are little things 
which might make or mar the day for a 
lonesome or discouraged somebody if only 
we took time to think of them. 

And then, of course, there is the more 
selfish side of the case Certainly every 
one of us is the better off, for much contact 
with the opinion of others — not just the 
little circle of friends that we get into the 
habit of seeing every day, but just as many 
others as possible. Our community life is 
one of the best parts of the college course. 
Let's not be selfish, but in our plans include 
just as many other members as ever we 
can, and — this is a prophecy — we shall be 
infinitely richer and better satisfied when 
June brings vacation time-. 



NOTICE. 

All copy for College News should be in 
the editors' bancs by Friday noon of each 
week. Copy that is not ready unril Friday 
morning shou'd be brought 10 the News 
Office on the fifth floor and not sent 
through the resident mail. Address gen- 
eral correspondence to Jessie Gid'ey, 
Eliot; Alumnae notes to Miss Vivian, 
College Hall; College notes to Sadie Sam- 
uel . Freeman; Atldelic. Literary and So- 
ciety notes to Winifred Hawkridge. Stone; 
Free Press to Mary Lee Cadwell, Wood; 
Parliament of Foo 1 s to Marie Warren, 
Fiske 



STICKNEY & SMITH. 

157 Tremont St., Boston, 

Allow io per cent, discount to 
Teachers and Pupils of Welles- 
ley College on 

Ladies' Costumes, 
Street, Walking Suits, 
Skirts and Garments 

of all Kinds, 

Waists and Furs. 

(OUR ONLY STORE.) 



FIRE PROOF 




Hotel Lenox 

Boylston and Exeter Streets 
Back Bay, BOSTON 

Two Minutes' Walk from 
the Back Bay Stations, 
and One Block from Cop- 
ley Square 

Charles A. Gleason, Manager. 
Send for illustrated booklet. 



J. TAILBY <Sfc SOIN, 

FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opposite R. R. Station 

Orders by mail or otherwise promptly attended to. 

Connected by Telephon 



JOSEPH Q. LOWELL 



OSMON C. BAILEY 



LOWELL BROS & BAILEY, 

General Commission Merchants 
and Wholesale Dealers in 

Foreign and Domestic Fruits 

and Produce of All Kinds. 

73 and 75 Clinton Street, Boston 
Ref.: Fourth Nat. Bk., Boston Fruit & Produce Ex 



WELLESLEY STEAM LAUNDRY 

BLOSSOH STREET. 

All kinds of Fancy Ironing at reasonable 
prices. Collections made Monday and Tues- 
day; deliveries, Thursday and Saturday. 



SAVES HOSIERY 



NEVER SLIPS, TEARS 
NOR UNFASTENS 

Every Pair 

Warranted 

The 




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SUPPORTER 

If your Dealer does not sell you this 
Supporter he does not sell the Best 

Every Clasp has the name 
Stamped on the Metal Loop 

0EOROE FROST CO., Makers, Boston, Mass 



COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE CAL ENDAR. 

March i, at 4.15 P.M., in College Hall Chapel, business meeting 
of the Christian Association to discuss the question, "Shall 
we continue the office of General Secretary." 

March 2, 7.30 P.M., regular meeting of the Christian Association. 
Speaker, Miss Bertha Conde, Student Secretary of the Amer- 
ican Committee. 

March 4, 3.20 P.M., in College Hall chapel, lecture by Mr. Samuel 
Arthur King. Subject: " Enunciation and Pronunciation." 

March 4, 7.30 P.M., Barnswallows Sophomore play, "Tommy's 
Wife," by Marie Warren. 

March 5, 1 1 A.M.', in Houghton Memorial Chapel. Sermon by 
Bishop John H. Vincent of the Methodist Episcopal Church 

March 5, 7. P.M., vespers 

March 6, 7.30 P.M., in College Hall Chapel, lecture by Mr. King. 

March 7, 4.15, P.M., in College Hall Chapel, lecture by Mr. King. 

COLL EGE N OTES. 

Professor William James of Harvard University will deliver 
a course of five lectures in connection with Philosophy Nine. 
Subject: "Pragmatism." The lectures are open to the Fac- 
ulty and to members of elective cou ses in the Department of 
Philosophy. 

At the "morning chapel services on the twenty-second, Mr. 
Alpheus Hardy of the Board of Tiustees addressed the congre- 
ion. Miss Hazard led the services. As a recessional the 
choir sang " America" the new national hymn, by Miss Kath- 
e ine Lee Bates, to the tune " The Son of God Goes Forth to 
War " 

Aftc this, a celebration was held in College Hall Chapel 
in honor of Washington's Birthday President Hazard 
■ poke on the opportunities of women for loyalty and patriotism. 
The hinging of the "Star Spangled Banner' iollowed; after 
which Mr. Hardy added to what he had said in chapel, on 
patriotism. "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" was sung 
and impromptu speeches were made by some of the girls. 
The exercises closed with " America. " 

In memory of Mr. Durant, a service was held in College Hall 
Chapel, Thursday evening, February 23rd. The College choir 
added not a little to the service. Mrs. Montgomery of the class 
of '84, gave a most interesting and delightful address. She 
tried to present to those who were not in College during his life- 
time, the personality of Mr. Durant and she dwelt chiefly upon 
the high ideals which he had for the College along three lines: 
bis love of truth his desire for service and his spirituality or 
religious ideal. The 20th of February would have been Mr. 
Durant's eighty-third birthday and thus the whole College 
united in a service to the memory of its founder. 

On Monday afternoon, Feb uai v 27, a se. ious fire, said to 
have st rted f-om a gas stove, broke out in the upper story of 
Norfolk Terrace. The fire company save: 1 , the house, and, as- 
sisted by a laige force of college girls removed practically all 
o!' the furniture and 1 ther personrl prope. tv from 'he building. 

The Board of the Christian Association has voted to recom- 
mend 1o the Association that the office of General Secretary be 
continued. At the business meeting to be held Wednesdav, 
March 1 . at 4. 1 5, this question will be discussed. Many students 
do not know about the work of the Secretary nor understand 
why she is needed here at Wellesley. It is hoped that all mem- 
bers of the Association and any others who are interested in this 
discussion will attend the business meeting, and hear about the 
work which it has been possible to do this year with the assist- 
ance of the General Secretary. 

On Thursday evening of this week. Miss Bertha Conde, one 
of the National Student Secretaries of America, will speak to all 
students in College Hall Chapel. It is hoped that all students 
may hear Miss Conde and may avail themselves of this oppor- 
tunitv to meet one whose touch with all the women students of 
America has been so intimate and personal. 



The Walnut p Scljool for Girls, 



NATICK. MASS. 



Tuition and Board, $600.00. 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Miss Conant and Miss Bigelow, Principals. 
SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW CO., 

JEWELLERS AND SILVERSMITHS, 
BOSTON. 

Fine Stationery, Umbrellas, Parasols, Wedding 
Gifts. Official Makers of the Wellesley Seal Pin. 
Fine Jewelry Repairing. 

Boston and Maine Railroad. 

Lowest Kates. Fast Train Service between Boston and Chicago, 
St. Louis, St. Paul, Minneapolis and all points West, Northwest and 
Southwest. 

Pullman Palace or Sleeping Cars on all through lines. For tick- 
ets and information apply at any principal ticket office of the Com- 
pany. D. J. FLANDEKS, Gen'l. Pass, and Tkt. Agt., Boston. 

Theatrical 'Wigs and MaKe-up, 

M. G. SLATTERY, 

226 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Near Touraine, Opp. Majestic Theatre. 
WIGS, BEARDS, CURLS, To rent for Private Theatricals 

MOUSTACHES. Masquerades, Carnivals. 

Grease Paints, Eye Pencils, Powders, Rouges, Etc. 

A. SHUMAN & CO., Boston 

Ladies' Suits made by Men Tailors, Ladies' Coats. Ladies' 
Waists. Ladies' Negligee Gowns and Sacques Ladies' Un- 
derwear, Ladies' Hosiery, Ladies' Shoes, Ladies' Gloves, 
Ladies' Complete Outfits. ... 

Shuman Corner. Washington and Summer Streets. 




The Berkeley Hotel, 

Berkeley and Boylston Streets- 
Modern In Every Detail. 

Restaurant for Ladies. Entrance on Boylston Street. 
JOHN A. SHERLOCK. 



L. P. HOLLANDER (& CO. 

Young Ladies' Qown^, Coats and Wraps, 

Millinery, Hats, Underwear and Gloves. 

We call special attention to a Large \ssortment of Dresses, made in our own workrooms for College and 

Street Wear, at very Reasonable Prices. 



202 to 216 Boylston Street and Park Square, Boston. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



FREE PRESS. 

I. 

We would propose the organization of the Barnsw allow Society 
into a closer body with more regular and definite responsibilities 
to the social life of the College. The aim of thus organizing 
the Barnswallows would not be to make the social life more com- 
plex by introducing more entertainments, but to make enter- 
tainments more general by taking some of them out of the hands 
of the particular societies and leaving them to a society which 
represents the whole student body. Our social life at Wellesley 
has been criticised as lacking spontaneity. If we admit the 
charge the reason is not far to seek: regular entertainments re- 
peated year after year and always under the management of 
some one of the societies, which control the sending of the in- 
vitations, cannot secure the same general interest as entertain- 
ments arranged for by Barnswallow Committees representing 
all members of the College. To be a guest is by no means the 
same as simply "belonging," with everybody else, to the enter- 
tainment. We must acknowledge that we take the Barnswal- 
low Society, as it now exists, to furnish a sort of second rate en- 
tertainment for the evenings when there is nothing else to do. 
We believe that the position of the Barnswallows should be 
changed, that it should come to bear the chief social responsi- 
bility of Wellesley, and that the social activities of the societies 
should become secondary. If this is ever to come to pass, the 
Barnswallows must be made a closely organized body, whose 
right to ''dates" in the entertainment scheme shall precede the 
claims of any other social organization. The result of dignify- 
ing the position of the Barnswallows and virtually giving it 
charge of the main social activities of Wellesley must be that 
social life here would become more general, more fresh and more 
spontaneous. S. G. Knight, 

L. J. McC, 

C P. Nelson, 

E. E. L. 

II 

Just now, when "there is music in the air," happiness in the 
hearts, and anticipation of the coming gaieties in the minds of 
all, a paltry act stands out in contrast with the joys of the mo- 
ment. It is startling to discover the spirit of speculation in 
Wellesley College, the same spirit that is in the man who stands 
without the theater entrance offering you tickets, after you 
have been turned away from the box office because all the seats 
were sold. Here at College the upper class girls have the first 
choice of seats for the Glee Club Concerts. The arrangement 
is fair and no one complains as long as the girls do not abuse their 
privileges. But to have them take advantage of the situation 
by buying tickets for themselves or other girls to sell to the 
lower class girls at a higher price than they paid for them should 
be beneath the dignity of any Wellesley student. Yet that is 
what has happened! It is obvious that this takes away the 
chances of the lower class girl to secure tickets and forces her 
into a corner to accept the terms thrust upon her. It seems 
needless to criticise the spirit of such an act here in a community 
of broad-minded, fair American girls. Yet Wellesley students 
have bought tickets under just such conditions, (though several 
had the courage to refuse such bargaining) ! 

Seriously, is it right and honorable to encourage the petty 
spirit of speculation to creep into the broad free atmosphere 
of our college life? O. 1907. 

III. 

While the spell of blue books is still upon us, another word about 
examinations may perhaps be spoken with greater impunity, 
now than later. When we find ourselves face to face with an 
examination paper, we are often obliged to piece out ragged 
shreds of information with a generous patch of surmise — a nicer 
word than bluff, by the way. It sometimes is correct surmise, 
and sometimes not, but too frequently we forget, or are too 
rushed, to ascertain the truth of the matter, and because words 
written on white paper always look so convincing, we come grad- 
ually to feel that because we put it in our blue book, it is so. 
For this reason many a hazy notion which might have been well- 
trained goes wrong. In some courses, blue books have been 
returned, sometimes to a few, sometimes to the whole class. 
In at least one instance books which were notable for their ex- 
cellence have been returned for class inspection, while in a num- 
ber of classes the examination papers have been minutely dis- 
cussed. These post-mortem examinations set right many an in- 
nocently held, yet erronous impression. They are of greatest 
advantage to students, who are too weary of mid- years, or too 
busy with the new Semester's work, to review their work care- 
fully by the new light gained from the examination questions. 
We feei a distinct sense of gratitude to those instructors who 
have adopted such courses, and would like to ask a similar favor 
if this is a possible and, in the instructor's opinion, a wise course, 
from those of the Faculty who have not tried some such a plan. 

H.Jl 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



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Trade Mark. 

EMBROIDERED 

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At "The Linen Store." 

This class of Wash Fabrics promises to be ex- 
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Especially adapted for the purpose are the 

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For Skirts and Suits the medium weight 
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COLLEGE NEWS 



HIGH 

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Established 1858. 

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DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS. 



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SOc and 60c per lb. 

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416 Washington St., (4th door North of Summer St.) 



Consumers' Xcague 
lllnoerwear 

MRS. H. E. CURRiER, 

10 Grove St., Wellesley. 



R. F EVANS, 

Painter and Decorator. 

Paper Hanging and Tinting - . 
Hll /Bail ®rbcra promptly attonfcet* to. 

P. O. BOX 66. 

458 Washington Street, Wellesley. 

H. L. FLAGG, 

Daily Papers, Periodicals, 
Stationery, Etc . 

Wright & Ditson Sporting Goods. 
Waban Block, Wellesley Sq 



PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 



James Korntved, 

Ladies' and Gent's Custom Tailor 

SHAW BLOCK, ROOM i, 
WELLESLEY SQUARE. 
Special attention paid to Pressing 
and Cleaning. 

R. DIEHL, JR., 

Livery and Boarding Stable, 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

Baggage Transferred to and from 
Station. Meet all trains. Orders 
promptly attended to. Hacks for 
Funerals and Parties. 

Telephone No. 16-2. 

New York and Boston 
Calcium Light Co. 

102 Utica Street, Boston. 
Tel. 673 Oxford. 

F. DIEHL & SON, 

Dealers in 

Coal, Wood, Hay & Grain, 

Wellesley, Mass. 
Telephone No. 16-4. 

STURTEVANT & HALEY 

BEEF AiND 
SUPPLY CO. 

38 and 40 
Faneuil Hall MarKet 

BOSTON. 

Telephone 033 Richmond. 



Chorus: 



"PROBLEMS." 

I. 

If the sides of a square are 8 by 2, 

And triangular at that. 
If eighty bones are found in the head 

Of a common or garden cat, 
If a girl could eat a pound of fudge 

As she browsed in the library, 
How manv alarm clocks could be wound 

With a "Phi Beta Kappa key 5 



Problems such as these have we; 
Wellesley is no snap, you see; 
Do not let your work pile up, 

Do it every day ; 
Then perhaps when you're grown up 

You'll get your B.A. 

II. 

If a student has her Monday free 

With not a thing to do, 
But go on an economics jaunt 

And write a farce or two, — 
If she runs her eye at sixteen books 

And gets her laundry packed, 
If the time should ever come to rest 

Would that girl know how to act? 

III. 
If the elevator took a trip 

Of several feet one day. 
And a brother came 1,000 miles 

To see his sister May, 
If the elevator would not work, 

As it sometimes won't you know, 
How long would brother Henry wait 

For those English wheels to go? 

IV. 
If a fire drill began at eight, 

By nine was almost don 
An^ all the girls that could not swim 

Were counted one by one — 
If a girl got asked to a Princeton Prom 

And down to the Vale boat race, 
How manv friends' good-looking clothes 

Could she get in her suit case? 



If yellow squash weighed 16 pounds 

And was served for 16 days. 
And on the 17th appeared 

In the form of mayonnaise, 
If fish balls hatched into chicken soup, 

And those baked beans, oh. dear! 
How much would Sally (iertrude weigh 

At the end of Senior year? 

R. W. P., O. A. N ., and A. L. G., Jr. 



WELLESLEY DISCOUNT 

- - AT - - 

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Bookshop, 

59 Bromfield St., Boston 

( Basement of the Paddock Building, Cor. Tremont St.) 
Tel. Main 3792. 



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Opp. Park St. Church 
George P. Hurll, Mgr. 
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John A. Morgan & Co. 

PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wellesley, Mast. 



DENTIST, 

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Telephone 113- Wellesley. 
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Choice Meats & Provisions 

Washington St., WellesUy. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



AL UMN/E NOTES. 

Correction. —Owing to a mistake in the reading of proof, 
the statement was made in COLLEGE NEWS for January twenty- 
fifth that Miss Marv Brigham Hill, 1893. was in the east during 
the fall. Miss Hill has not been east for three years, but her 
mother. Mrs (unms \V Hill, was at home for three months and 
returned to Colorado in December. Mrs. Hill and her daughter 
are now at ;6<) Highland avenue, Redlands. California. 

The memorial address on the anniversary of Mr. Durant s 
birthday was given this year by Mrs. Helen Barrett Mont- 
gomery of the class of 1884. The power of Mr. Durant's per- 
sonality, his eager search for and advocacy of Truth, his ideal 
of service in great things and small, and the depth and beauty 
of his spiritual life, were made real again and an inspiration 
by one who had felt and seen them. Professor Currier and 
Mrs Ida Parker Hill, former members of the Faculty, and Miss 
Charlotte H. Conant, Miss Florence Bigelow and Mrs. Nellie 
Wright Howe, of the class of 1884, were present and with the 
speaker, alumnae members of the Faculty and others interested, 
gathered in the Horsford Parlor for a more informal talk about 
the earlier days of the College. 

On Saturday afternoon, January twenty-first, the Boston 
Wellesley College Club held a reception at the house of its presi- 
dent, Mrs. Alice Upton Pearmans, 1883, 388 Beacon street, 
Boston. A large number attended and a very pleasant after- 
noon was spent. The members of the Wellesley College Glee 
Club were the guests of the day, and entertained the club by 
singing delightfully a number of college songs. 

In response to the invitation of the Executive Board ot the 
Wellesley Alumnae Association, forty former students of the 
College met in Providence, on February twenty-two, to form a 
Rhode Island Wellesley Club. The guests of honor were Dean 
Pendleton and Miss El'va Young, 1896, and Miss Lucy J Dow, 
1892, members of the preceding Executive Board. The tables 
were decorated in red, white and Wellesley blue, the work of 
the committee on arrangements, of which Miss Alice Hunt, 
1895, vvas chairman The place cards combined the Wellesley 
flag and the United States flag. 

Mrs Ada Wing Mead, 1886, President of the Board, gave 
an address of welcome and Mrs. Emily Meader Easton, 1891, 
was appointed chairman. 

Dean Pendleton spoke of the value of Wellesley Clubs, both 
to the College and to club members, gave an account of recent 
buildings at the College, and of the formation of the Phi Beta 
Kappa Chapter. Mrs. Margaret Hill Irons, President of the 
Federation of Women's Clubs in Rhode Island, moved that a 
Rhode Island Wellesley Club be formed. The motion was 
carried, and a committee appointed to draw up a constitution, 
nominate officers, and arrange for the next meeting. The 
roll-call of classes showed the largest representation to be from 
1892. Before the meeting adiourned, greetings were sent to 
the College, through Dean Pendleton. 

Miss Evelvn S. Hall, 1879, Miss Aurelia A. Hall, 1884, and 
their sister Miss Mary Hall, sailed on the Canopic for four months 
in Italy and Greece. 

On Saturday, February 18, Dr. Charlotte T. Roberts, 1880, 
read a paper before the New England Association of Chem- 
istry Teachers. 

Mrs. Corinne Abercrombie Waldo, 1900, is living in El Paso, 
Texas, where Mr. Waldo is general freight and passenger agent 
for the southwestern division of the Southern Pacific Railroad. 

Miss Marv Stevens Ayres, 1900, is teaching in Dayton, Ohio, 
and is the presiding member of the Literary Club this year. 

Miss Margaret Frances Byington, [900, has been engaged in 
charity work in Boston since her year of studv at Columbia 
University. 

Miss Emma Florence Colby, 1900, has been acting as private 
secretary in a charitable institution for homeless children 

Miss Alice P. Cromack, 1900, is teaching in St. Mary's College. 
Dallas, Texas. 

Miss Chloe Curtis, 1900, is a visitor among the girls who are 
out on probation from the State Industrial School, at Lancas- 
ter, Massachusetts. 



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To moan or gloat, oh do not stay 
In Wel=les=ley, but cheer your souls 
By looking at our china bowls, 

Our sofa pillows, and our soaps — 
And try to bolster up your hopes ; 

And when you find you've passed 
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Makers of the 

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to Wellesley, Radcliffe, Mount Holyoke, Bryn 
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Williams, Amherst, Colorado College, Stanford and the others. 
CORRECT HOODS FOR ALL DEGREES. 
Illustrated bulletin and samples on request. (A. W. Stocking, 
Wellesley, 190'2, in charge of correspondence.) 




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COLLEGE NEWS 



ATHLETIC QIRI S, ATTENTION! 



The entry blanks of Sports for this spring and next fall are 
now posted on the Athletic Association bulletin board. We 
hope everyone knows it by this time, if not through her own 
faithful observance of bulletins, at least through her friends. 
Yes, everyone must know and should be seriously considering 
signing. Let the response be enthusiastic and prompt. Let 
everyone remember that the lists come down at 4.15 P.M., on 
Friday, March 10, and that after that time there will 1 
chance to enter for these two seasons. Remember, too. that 
from this entry list sufficient numbers must be qualified t< 
low for the many disqualifications and withdrawals from Col- 
lege that may occur from now until Field Day in the fall, so 
that the required minimum Squad number may be maintained 
until this final competition. If this is fully realized and if all 
information is gained from careful reading of the notices, not 
from hearsay, we trust there will be no more sad class defaults 
in Basket-ball or anything else. 

You notice that there are no entry blanks for Running or for 
Shot Put. This is because the Executive Board has voted to 
stop all track athletics. The Board has two reasons for decid- 
ing thus. One reason, which is untechnical, is the very ap- 
nt feeling of disinterest and even feeling of antipathy, with 
which the members of these Sports have kept up their required 
three hours practise each week. Some actually delighted in a 
stormy day that kept them from the track. How different 
from the attitude of the average members of other Squads! 
This lack of enthusiasm is due to the technical reason, that 
track athletics are not sports that require instructors, but are 
strenuous forms of exercise that require trainers. The intel- 
lectual team-work and game elements, which are so valuable in 
our other sports, are entirely lacking. Then, granting that 
track athletics have their value when properly managed, wc 
must admit that we cannot find suitable trainers and that in- 
structors are wholly inadequate. The results of the past two 
years have shown this. 

This decrease of sports offered makes possible larger and 
better Squads in the five that are to be carried on these next 
two seasons, and we close with a plea to all for co-operation in 
making our Athletic Association more successful than ever be- 
fore. S. J. W 

Student Volunteer Rallv, February Twenty=Second. 

The eighth annual Young Peoples' Missionary Rally was held in Boston on 
Wednesday, February twenty-second, under the auspices of the Boston Stu- 
dent Volunteer League. The meetings were conducted in the New Old South 
Church. Copley Square, and there was a large audience at each one of the sess- 
ions. Many Welles'.ey girls attended the meetings, some to stay all day, and 
others a part of the time. 

The morning session was opened by a devotional service of fifteen minutes. 
Then followed a powerful address on " The Motion of Missions." by Rev. Cor- 
nelius H. Pattoti. I). I)., secretary of the American Board. Dr. Patton began 
by reading short extracts from the letters of the last ten applicants to the 
American Board, showing the reasons why they wished to enter upon Foreign 
Missionary service. 

Dr. Patton was followed by Rev. Charles H. Moss of Maiden, who spoke 
on " The Power in Missions." Mr. Moss said that the power in missions is the 
power of God Himself; it is the Div'ne Spirit working through human person- 
ality. 

The best speaker of the morning was Miss Ruth Rouse, Traveling Secretary 
of the .Student Volunteer movement, whom we Wellesley girls remember hear- 
ing with keen interest a few months ago. Miss Rouse spoke about the Stu- 
dent Volunteer movement in its relation to the home church. Among the facts 
which the Volunteer movement is trying to emphasize. Miss Rouse mentioned: 
the urgency of the need abroad; the responsibility of every Christian to help 
meet this need; and the necessity of giving our very best to the missionary 

work. 

The afternoon session began at two o'clock with a devotional service, and 

two short addresses on the Silver Bag Conference by Samuel B. Capen, Presi- 
dent of the American Board, and by Harry Wade Hicks. After these ad- 
dresses the large meeting was divided into conferences for Young Peoples 
Leaders, Sunday-school Workers and Students. 



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THEATER NOTES. 



Hollis-street Theater — Lillian Russell in "Lady Teazle." 
Tremont Theater — E. S. Willard in "The Brighter Side." 
Colonial Theater — Charles Wyndham in "The Case of Re- 
bellious Susan." 
Boston. Theater — "Quincy Adams Sawyer" 
Park Theater — Cecelia Loftus in "The Serio-Corrlic Govern- 
ess." 
Majestic Theatre — De Wolf Hopper in "Wang" 



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The evening session of the Rally began very enthusiastically, and with per- 
haps an even larger audience than had been present during the day. Mr. 
( lalen M . Fisher, National Association Secretary to .Japan, spoke about " Present 
Day Opportunities in Japan," and particularly about his work among the 
Japanese soldiers. Mr. Fisher was followed by Rev. William Ashmore, D. D., 
who has been a missionary in China for fifty-four years. Dr. Ashmore spoke 
of the stages of "Ground Clearing" and "Seed Sowing" through which 
missionary work in China has passed, until now at last has begun the time of 
'* Sheaf Gathering.'' It was very impressive to hear Dr. Ashmore, after a 
life time of missionary service, speak so enthusiastically and with so much 
assurance of the ultimate success of missionary effort. 

After the close of this meeting there was the usual rush to hnd our friends 
and catch the train to Wellesley. Hut I am sure we were all very glad to 
have been aide to attend the Rally which brought us not only a great deal of 
inspiration and missionary enthusiasm, but also many practical suggestions 
for our every day life and work. One of the girls expressed what very many 
of us felt, when she said she did not know of any other way in which she 
would rather have spent her holiday. And now girls, — you who are to be 
here next year. — won't you remember that on February 22, 1906, there is go- 
ing to be another Missionary Rally in Boston? Plan to go, if you possible 
can, and see if the meetings do not bring to you inspiration and practical help. 

().. 1906. 



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